Projects

    Project description

    This 5-year (2017-2022) implementation science project will develop methods for adapting the WH0 SUPRE-MISS intervention for suicide attempters in parallel projects in Ningxia, China, and among Inuit in Nunavut, Canada. These methods for adapting SUPRE-MISS will then be promulgated in Inuit and other indigenous populations, other parts of China, other low- and middle-income countries, and other low-resourced settings in high-income countries. METHODS: PHASE 1. Conduct focus groups with local stakeholders to identify local factors that need to be considered when developing a location-specific version of SUPRE-MISS that provides a brief educational intervention about suicide prevention to individuals who have recently made a suicide attempt and periodic social support and access to emergency services to these highrisk individuals. PHASE 2. Pilot-test the adapted intervention in a small number of settings for one year. PHASE 3. Revise and then scale-up the intervention to more settings for 30 months and continuously collect outcome measures, process measures, and resource utilization measures (for cost-effectiveness assessment). PHASE 4. Conduct post-intervention focus groups with stakeholders to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the intervention. Integrate these qualitative results with the quantitative results (e.g., rates of repeated suicidal behavior) to prepare a report on the process of implementing the SUPRE-MISS intervention in low-resource settings. Work with administrators and policy makers in China, Nunavut, and other locations to develop policies that will widely promulgate the use of this approach to suicide prevention.

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    Project description

    The plan of this project is to first conduct a study of how calls from frequent callers are currently being handled over the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL) network in the United States and the effects of existing practices on the callers’ wellbeing and patterns of subsequent repetition of calling. This study will also gather information about the characteristics of frequent callers, their perceived needs, and the beliefs of counsellors concerning how to best be of help to them. After this first research phase, recommendations will be made, based upon the findings, about how to best establish protocols and practice models in order to beeter help frequent callers, when calls are routed to the new specialized service for them.

    The plan is: 1) to conduct a systematic review of all published and “grey” literature on the characteristics of frequent callers, and approaches to “manage” their calls and help them; and 2) to monitor calls from the approximately 150 people who call 30 or more times a month during the Winter of 2020, to determine the nature of their calls, the nature of their situation/problems/needs, the nature of the responses they are currently receiving over the phone, the “helpfulness” and effects of different current responses and techniques.

    (2020-2021)

    WEBINAIRE (en anglais): https://crise.ca/en/webinaires-en/saison-2020-webinaires-en/best-practices-in-interventions-with-frequent-callers-to-helplines/

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    Project description

    This project proposes an in-depth North-South discussion on issues related to national suicide prevention strategies. National suicide prevention strategies and public policies are recommended by WHO and implemented by numerous States worldwide. However, their effectiveness in preventing suicidal behaviours – and the effectiveness of each individual component – has not be empirically demonstrated.  In this context, a discussion involving partner organisations from various cultures and using a variety of approaches to suicide prevention appears necessary. The goal is, first and foremost, to establish a solid foundation for identifying international research questions that are crucial to developing worldwide collaborations in suicide prevention. In turn, these collaborations will support recognition of CRISE as the WHO Collaborating Centre on suicide prevention for North America.

    This project will lead to the production and dissemination of a one-hour webinar /documentary, as well as a written synthesis of findings. These tools will contribute to the discussion on the role of national strategies in the various contexts and in regards of the different needs of Northern and Southern countries. The webinar will be made using video footage of interviews with key stakeholders from Mexico, Brazil, Portugal, New Zealand, Bhutan and Québec. The summary and consensus document will be translated in French, English, Spanish and Portuguese.

    The video and document will be publicly available on the CRISE website and disseminated through various networks (education, research, public health, political and community organisations) at the end of 2020 and during the winter of 2021.

    (2020-2021)

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    Project description

    This project aims to develop understanding of requests for Medical Aid in Dying (MAID).

    (2017-2019)

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    Project description

    2018-2020

    Through collaboration with the health network, this project aims to develop an innovative strategy for knowledge transfer and application in suicide prevention with persons living with an intellectual disability or an Autism Spectrum Disorder.

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