Long-term effects of a comprehensive police suicide prevention program: 22-year follow-up

Auteurs

Brian Mishara, Louis-Francis Fortin.

Résumé

textbfBackground: Mishara and Martin (2012) reported decreases in suicides 12 years after implementation of a police suicide prevention program. textbfAims: We aimed to determine whether suicide decreases were sustained 10 years later. textbfMethod: We examined coroners’ investigations of police deaths from 2009 through 2018. Results: From 2009 to 2018, Montreal suicide rates increased but this was not significantly different from the previous 12 years and the rate for other Quebec police remained significantly higher than Montreal (p textless .006). The 22-year Montreal postprogram rate was significantly lower than the preprogram rate (p textless .002), and the 22-year rate for other police during the same years was not significantly different from earlier. textbfLimitations: Uncontrolled factors may have influenced the rates, including the 11% increase in women in the Montreal police. The observed mean aging of the Montreal police personnel would have been expected to bias toward finding increases in suicides. However, the maintenance of decreases in suicide rates was observed. textbfConclusion: The decrease in suicides observed 12 years after the program was sustained for another 10 years, and appears related to the program. Rates for comparable police remained higher. A continuing comprehensive suicide prevention program tailored to the context may reduce suicides for extended time periods. MONTRÉAL QUÉBEC CANADA SUICIDE-COMPLÉTÉ PRÉVENTION POLICE ÉVALUATION PROGRAMME IMPLANTATION PRÉVALENCE TENDANCE EFFICACITÉ

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